Must Read, Parkinson's Disease, Parkinson's exercise, Research

PD Dyskinesias and Role of Inflammation in PD

Two interesting pieces just came across my electronic desk. One involves dyskinesia treatment. The other concerns growing evidence of the role of inflammation in PD.

They are worth attention.

https://www.acsh.org/news/2017/08/28/advance-treatment-parkinsons-disease-11749

https://psychcentral.com/news/2017/08/28/curbing-inflammation-may-reduce-risk-of-alzheimers-parkinsons/125250.html

Advertisements
Davis Phinney Foundation, National Parkinson's Foundation, Parkinson Disease Foundation, Parkinson's Disease, Parkinson's exercise, Parkinson's Foundation, PDF

Hall of Famer Okun Opines on PD Rx

I wondered this as I read the JAMA Network piece on best practices in PD care: “Who is this fluent writer plumping interdisciplinary PD care?” NEW recruit to the cause, I murmured to myself.

Nope.

Got to the author’s name at the end. No other than Shuffling Editor Hall of Famer, UF’s  Michael Okun.

More good work from the Chief.
Read and learn.
Davis Phinney Foundation, Palliative Care, Parkinson's Disease

PREPARE! Val Trumpets to Parkie Families

Shuffling Editor Note: This post is the work of Valerie Herrero, steadfast widow of Gerard Herrero. Gerard died May 26 from complications of his PD, diagnosed in 2005. Gerard never, ever gave in to his PD, which he and Valerie fully “owned.” The Herrero’s were headline members of the North Tampa PD Support Group. Valerie continues to serve as the email megaphone for the group and many other PD service organizations and individuals in the Tampa Bay area. Valerie is unstoppable when she seizes an issue and makes it hers. Here she recounts PD the journey she and Gerard had and offers lessons learned.

By Valerie Herrero

On Friday, May 26, 2017, my husband, Gerard Herrero, left the world, as we know it. Gerard is free from the Parkinson’s, cardiovascular disease and related autoimmune issues he and I wrestled with for 13 years.

PD started, as a nuisance twitching of one finger but gradually became challenging, trying and very ugly. There were shaking, freezing, balance issues; difficulty getting up from chairs; difficultly dressing, especially with buttons and zippers, socks and tennis shoes.

It became challenging to eat at home or in a restaurant. Holding tight onto objects such as cups and glasses, sandwiches, forks, etc. became an adventure.

As a care partner, you learn to modify and adapt. For example, this last year we moved his tax preparation, accounting services and financial advisory business to a home office after his PD worsened.

Weekly exercise became the top of our agenda with YMCA PD Spinning, Rock Steady Boxing, Tai Chi, PT, OT and walking. We mastered walking sticks and walkers to push forward. We were always looking for something new to try.

PD drugs started to buck Gerard. The last 2 years he had more off times than on times. Adjusting Carbidopa-levodopa dosages was unsuccessful. Some days he would take 12 – 14 pills in a 24-hour span.

Then in May 2014, his immune system went wacky. Gerard’s platelet count dove to dangerous levels. In December 2016, Gerard was diagnosed with Bullous pemphigoid Disease, an autoimmune skin disorder.

Words I leave for Parkies and their care community: Get PREPARED! PD is an ugly, malicious, humbling disease that causes other health issues and life trials. Whether you accept it or not, realize it or not, death is inevitable and one day it will knock.

Everyone needs to start assembling their team of doctors, creating a palliative action plan and finalizing an end of life care plan. Get all your documents in order: (medical, estate, will, wishes, organ donations, etc.).  You never know when it’s going to be your last breath.

No matter what stage of PD you are in……Please….. Please make every day the best gift you have. Create memories because time is precious!

 

Please take the time to live, love and laugh as if today is your last.    Don’t assume anything. Someone else higher up is in charge and has the master plan.     

Uncategorized

Two Extraordinary Parkinson’s Warriors

The Parkinson’s world has an inordinate number of compassionate and purpose-driven people. They  modestly embody — every day– the Rotary International touchstone of “Service Above Self.”

I consider four extraordinary: one in Florida and three in Denver, CO. The Floridian is Dr. Michael Okun, the whirlwind University of Florida neurologist, organizational leader and best-selling author.

One Coloradan is Diane Cook, visionary creator of the PD SELF training program for Parkies. She is joined in my PD Hall of Fame by Denverites Benzi Kluger and Kirk Hall.

Benzi and Kirk are joined at the hip–Benzi the doc and Kirk his patient and collaborator. I was happy to enlist in the Benzi/Kirk mission to reframe Palliative Care as a life-enhancing approach to PD patient care.

Benzi and Kirk are artfully profiled in a recent University of Colorado publication. Please read:

https://www.uchealth.org/today/2017/07/31/palliative-care-for-patients-with-neurodegenerative-disease/

You will be astonished at the depth and importance of their work together. I am privileged to call  them friends.

 

Davis Phinney Foundation, Must Read, National Parkinson's Foundation, Parkinson Disease Foundation, Parkinson's Disease, Parkinson's Foundation, PDF, Research

The PD-Autoimmune Connection

Shuffling Editor note: I am intrigued by growing evidence that PD is an autoimmune disorder. This review article makes the point clearly. It appeared in Parkinson’s News Today by Magdalena Kegel.

“Parkinson’s disease may in part be driven by autoimmune processes, according to researchers who discovered that certain immune cells react to alpha-synuclein — a protein that accumulates in the brains of Parkinson’s patients.

“The findings, published in the journal Nature, raise the possibility that immunotherapy could be used to slow down disease processes in people with Parkinson’s. An immune reaction to alpha-synuclein could potentially also be used to identify people at risk of developing the disease.

“‘The idea that a malfunctioning immune system contributes to Parkinson’s dates back almost 100 years,” David Sulzer, PhD, a professor of neurobiology at Columbia University Medical Center and one of the study’s lead authors, said in a press release.

“’But until now, no one has been able to connect the dots. Our findings show that two fragments of alpha-synuclein, a protein that accumulates in the brain cells of people with Parkinson’s, can activate the T-cells involved in autoimmune attacks,” he said.

“The study, “T cells from patients with Parkinson’s disease recognize α-synuclein peptides,” suggested that immune T-cells react to neurons in which large amounts of abnormal alpha-synuclein has piled up.

“Together with colleagues at the La Jolla Institute for Allergy and Immunology, the research team took blood samples from 67 patients with Parkinson’s disease and 36 healthy controls of the same age and mixed them with fragments of alpha-synuclein and other neuronal proteins.

“The idea was to observe how immune cells present in the blood would react to the protein parts. While immune cells from healthy people did not react much to the presence of the nerve cell components, T-cells in patients’ blood reacted strongly to alpha-synuclein. This indicated that they had been primed to recognize the protein.

“The response could explain why genetic studies of Parkinson’s disease have repeatedly flagged a genetic region, which is responsible for the immune system’s ability to tell the body’s own structures from foreign ones found on microbes and tumors.

“Sulzer’s lab had shown three years ago that dopamine neurons have proteins on their surfaces that act as flags that aid the immune system in recognizing foreign structures. They suggested in 2014 that T-cells had the potential to attack these neurons in an autoimmune process.

“The new study provided evidence of how this might happen. According to Sulzer, the T-cells might start reacting to neurons when they start accumulating abnormal alpha-synuclein, mistakenly thinking they are a foreign structure.

“In most cases of Parkinson’s, dopamine neurons become filled with structures called Lewy bodies, which are primarily composed of a misfolded form of alpha-synuclein,” Sulzer said.

“Young, healthy cells break down and recycle old or damaged proteins,” he said. “But that recycling process declines with age and with certain diseases, including Parkinson’s. If abnormal alpha-synuclein begins to accumulate, and the immune system hasn’t seen it before, the protein could be mistaken as a pathogen that needs to be attacked.”

“But so far, researchers do not know if the immune response is what triggers Parkinson’s in the first place, or if it drives disease progression once the disease has been triggered by other factors.

“”These findings, however, could provide a much-needed diagnostic test for Parkinson’s disease, and could help us to identify individuals at risk or in the early stages of the disease,” said study co-leader Alessandro Sette, a professor in the Center for Infectious Disease at La Jolla.'”