Uncategorized

Calling All Mammalian Congregators

My wife Struby and I are reading a fascinating book:

 

A General Theory of Love
by Thomas Lewis, MD; Fari Amini, MD; Richard Lannon, MD
Vintage Books (C) 2000

In it we learn the neurophysiological reason that properly structured support groups, such as PD SELF, are so vital for overcoming health challenges. Read on (emphasis added):

 

“…. One study, for instance, found that social isolation tripled the death rate following a heart attack. Another found that going to group psychotherapy doubled the postsurgical lifespan of women with breast cancer. A third noted that leukemia patients with strong social supports had two-year survival rates more than twice that of those who lacked them.

 

“In his fascinating book Love & Survival, Dean Ornish surveyed the medical literature on the relationship between isolation and human mortality. His conclusion: dozens of studies  demonstrate that solitary people have a vastly increased rate of premature death from all causes — they are three to five times likelier to due early that people with ties to a caring spouse, family or community.

 

“With results like these backing the medical efficacy of mammalian congregation, you might think that treatments like group therapy after breast cancer would not be standard. Guess again. Affiliation is not a drug or an operation, and that makes it nearly invisible to Western medicine. Our doctors are not uninformed; on the contrary, most have read these studies and grant them a grudging intellectual acceptance. But they don’t believe in them; they can’t bring themselves to base treatment decisions on a rumored phantom like attachment. They prevailing medical paradigm has no capacity to incorporate the concept that a relationship is a physiologic process, as real and as potent as any pill or surgical procedure.
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Parkinson's Disease, Research, Uncategorized

How my post won, but didn’t, a $2,500 prize

January 12 was a strenuous day. After helping facilitate Module 4 of PD SELF —the groundbreaking personal leadership program of the Parkinson’s Foundation, PF for short—I was wasted and ready for a Sam Adams Pumpkin beer…..or two.

Come 2:00 PM, when I finally sat with my Sam to check email,textito-2500-award what did my tired eyes spy but a message from PF.

Here’s an edited version of that eye-popping email: “I have good news for you —remember when you helped us by writing a post (for a contest)? It turns out PF won the most liked post of the year (yours) award, which means we get the sum of $2,500.”

I asked myself who is the “we” getting the $2,500? Posing that question publicly, however, would be very bad form.

I imagine the whispers at HQ.  “He wants what? To take money for himself that we would use for research to find a cure for PD? Come on man! Get real.”

Brain Lightning……….Write a tongue-in-cheek email to new PF leader John Lear implicitly asking the money question. Have it coming to Lear from two top aides.

Pure genius………. Worthy of my chosen nom-de-plume, “The Wily Old Editor.” So it was—a practical joker’s delight.

“Dear John:

“Remember that passionate and sometimes difficult to manage PAIR (Patient Advocate) in Tampa whom we told you about? The guy who blogs at www.shufflingeditor.com.

“Turns out the dude actually can write. He won us a $2,500 prize…… for  contributing to a commercial blog about Moving Day. It was the most liked post of the year. Since the money is ours, consider sending him an “Atta boy” note as his consolation prize.

‘He blusters but is a sucker for sentimentality.”

The  connoisseurs’ email was sent Jan. 12.

To date no response. Nada.

Swing-and-a-miss, it would seem.

Anyway, here’s the version of the $2,500 column that appeared in the late Tampa Tribune and on this blog in April 2016.


MY PARKINSON’S CRASH COURSE

I wasn’t ready for a crash course in neurology that day two years ago. I was enjoying semi-retirement, assuming my medical writing days were far behind me. But then the doctor said, “You have Parkinson’s disease.”

Ever since, I have been immersed in Parkinson’s 101: what it means to live with a chronic neurological disease.

This month is Parkinson’s Awareness Month. Accordingly, I think even more about the 5,000 people in the U.S. who will also hear those words this month.

What do I wish I had known when I was diagnosed?

  • It’s a snowflake disease.Just like a snowflake, each of us is unique and so is our Parkinson’s. Do not assume your disease will look like someone else’s.
  • Some symptoms are invisible.Because many of us associate Parkinson’s with movement symptoms, we may ignore signs of depression, fatigue, constipation, or sleep problems (especially acting out nightmares). In recent years, the medical field has recognized that such symptoms are part of the disease. If you experience them, tell your doctor so they can be diagnosed and treated for what they really represent.
  • A Parkinson’s specialist can help.Most of us see a general neurologist for our care, without realizing we might benefit from seeing a movement disorder specialist. Those neurologists, who have undergone two years of additional training, can help us to better manage the disease and stay current on research and clinical trials.
  • Staying active is essential. Parkinson’s may affect our movement, but staying active can help in the long run. Research shows that intensive, sustained exercise (such as boxing, hot yoga, interval cycling} can ease symptoms and combat fatigue. And that regular daily activity (going for walks, doing the laundry) can help improve life with Parkinson’s.
  • We can benefit from complementary care. In addition to medications, we can benefit from physical, speech and occupational therapy and the knowledge of nutritionists and psychotherapists. Putting together a care team of these professionals early on can pay off for years to come. But due to the fragmentation of PD care delivery; it takes effort on your part to assemble that team.
  • All support groups not created equal. Support groups have different constituencies (young/elderly onset—newly diagnosed), different energy levels, different ambitions and agendas. Shop widely before you choose.
  • There is a lack of localized information. Patients want close-to-home answers. Where do I locate the physical therapy that doctors often suggest? How do I find a personal trainer who specializes in PD? Who can help me make my home safe from falls? Where do I enroll in recommended tai chi, spinning or boxing classes? In most locales, there is no one place to find answers to those and dozens more local questions. National PD foundations offer effective national advice but can only do so much at the granular, local level.
  • We can live well. Most importantly, I learned it is not only possible to corral the disease but essential to do so. Never, never give in to the disease or lose hope. Cognitive decline and dementia are worrisome (but not inevitable) accomplices to PD neuromuscular difficulties. Find your passions. Mine are advocating for research, raising awareness and sharing validated information.

Also remember that you are not are not alone. There are 1 million of us nationwide. Groups such as the Parkinson’s Disease Foundation and the National Parkinson Foundation are available to support us. Contact them to find information and resources. Together, we cannot only live well with Parkinson’s, one day we can end it.